Suicide Prevention

Within the span of a week, the world lost two widely admired people with the tragic deaths of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade.

Bourdain, 61, and Spade, 55, reportedly died by suicide, casting a sad shadow on how mental health issues can affect anyone. In fact, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there has been an increase in suicide rates in nearly every state since 1999. The annual rate of suicide rose by nearly 30 percent for people over age 10, with the largest increase coming from middle-aged adults — ages 45 to 64.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, suicide is a major public health concern. Over 40,000 people die by suicide each year in the United States, and it is the 10th leading cause of death overall. Suicide is complicated and tragic but it is often preventable. Knowing the warning signs for suicide and how to get help can help save lives.

Behavior that may indicate someone is suicidal includes:

Talking about feeling hopeless, trapped, a burden to others or wanting to die.

  •   – Talking about feeling hopeless, trapped, a burden to others or wanting to die.
  •   – Unusual mood swings or withdrawing from family, friends and usual activities.
  •   – Giving away important possessions.
  •   – Increased use of alcohol or drugs.
  •   – (for a complete list, visit https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/how-we-can-all-prevent-suicide/ )

If you or someone you know needs help, call (800) 273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. You can also text HOME to 741741 to access free, 24-hour support from the Crisis Text Line.

You or the people you know who may be at risk are not alone.  One in ten Americans struggles with depression at some point in their lives.  The great news is that the overwhelming majority of those who seek treatment for depression are treated successfully.